Dunholme Old School Community Centre

History

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The Dunholme Old School was built in 1864 under the "School Sites Act" of 1861 whereby any piece of land could be donated for use as a place of education. The land that the School stands on was donated by William Tougue of Branston

The Origin

The DOSC is the old junior school of the village of Dunholme, Lincolnshire.  In 1864 the  land was conveyed under the School Sites Act 1841 for the  - “Education of  children and adults of children only of the labouring, manufacturing and other poorer classes in the Parish of Dunholme”.   The Trustees being the Bishop of Lincoln, The Archdeacon of Stow and the Vicar of Dunholme.   The  Church of England built the school and administered it until the 1944 Education Act when the Lincolnshire County Council assumed responsibility.
In the late 70’s with the growth of the village it became evident that the school was become too small. A new school was built in the village in 1981 and, after a lot of discussions, a group of villagers arranged with the Trustees to take over the management of the old junior school in 1984, for the setting up of a community centre.  It was decided by the Trustees  to have a hire agreement  with  the management committee who would be  running  the old school as a community centre.  This would be at a peppercorn rent as the management committee would be responsible for all maintenance and insurance.
Through the years the committee has struggled to keep on top of the maintenance.  A building of that age, not built to modern standards, and  previously having little money spent on it by the County Council, requires a lot of money.  Through  fund raising activities and matched grants from the RDC, County and District Councils  there has been a gradual upgrading of the fabric and facilities within the building.
Although Dunholme already has a good village hall the old school manages to attract many users.  This is mainly due to the village hall being much larger and attracting a different type of clientele.   There is no rivalry between the two organisations, indeed both the Chairman and Secretary of the DOSC plus a committee member are also on the village hall committee as Treasurer, Secretary and Trustee.
The activities of the Old School includes regular Whist and Bingo, a weekly Luncheon Club for the elderly organised through Age Concern, adult education classes,  meetings  of the Royal British Legion, Patients and Doctors Association, Rural Challenge meetings, amateur dramatic rehearsals,  music rehearsals, fetes, fairs, jumble sales and private parties.  In the old canteen there is now a well established camera club.   
The Lincolnshire County Council has reorganised adult education in the Lincoln area to include a centralised  Continuing Education Centre with more use to be made of rural venues.  It was therefore felt that greater use could be made of the facilities at the old school and earn revenue from the unused classrooms that was previously a snooker club.   The committee has set up a training establishment with an  aim to provide low cost education and training for the local rural community.   It caters for the areas of West Lindsey, Lincoln City and parts of North Kesteven and not just for the area around Dunholme.  This organisation is run by volunteers and was 50% funded by the Lincolnshire Training and Enterprise Council.  Other funds coming from the Lincolnshire CountryWork Scheme  with help from the Community Council of Lincolnshire.
In 1998 the Trustees of the Bishop of Lincoln the Archdeacon of Stow and the Vicar of Dunholme decided that they should apply the "Revertor of School Sites Act".
This stated that any property donated under the "School Sites Act" should be reverted back to the person who donated the land, or his successors, if the site was no longer required for the purpose for which it was donated.
However as the management were the current tenants they were given time to buy the property at the valuation.
Funding was sought from the National lottery Funding Council and, after three attempts and a reduction in planned renovation, the purchase price was awarded.
Today renovation work still goes on but only in piecemeal as revenue becomes available.

Our Mission

The future of the Old School lies in any funding, donations  and grants that the Trustees are able to access. The ideal would be to renovate the whole site including the main school building. This we believe would cost in the region approaching one million pounds sterling. (1M GBP). This sum is of course out of the realms of just local fund raising.  We therefore have to apply for funding and grants from whatever source that may be. Several applications have been made to the National Lottery Charities Board, now called the Big Lottery Fund.  But even here we are unable to apply for more that 250,000 without offering matched funding.

The Dunholme Old School Community Centre is a voluntary non-profit making organisation whose aims are to maintain and improve the facilities of the old school for the benifit of the local community